Dialogue & Voice

Strong dialogue is often not given special attention, but weak dialogue will throw a reader off every time. Additionally, voice throughout your novel is something that can make or break it in the publishing world. To watch all of the WordNerds’ videos on dialogue and voice, use the embedded playlist. To find a specific topic with regards to dialogue or voice, use the list below or the search bar.

Bad [Expletive Deleted] Words in YA

Calyn Morgan talks about swearing in young adult lit–should you include “bad” words?

Believable Dialogue and Book Club Updates

Calyn Morgan talks about how to make your dialogue more realistic.

Creating Character Voice

Kellie Sheridan talks about voice and how she created voices for the characters in her new series.

D. E. L. Connor: Profanity in YA

D. E. L. Connor–author of the Spirit Warriors series–talks about using profanity in Young Adult Literature.

DON’T Say What You Are Thinking

Meghan Jashinsky uses an example from LOST to illustrate how important it is for your characters NOT to say exactly what they are thinking.

Don’t Think What You’re Thinking?

Meghan Jashinsky talks about managing your character’s inner thoughts/monologue.

First Person versus Third Person

Emma Gisclair gives some suggestions for how to decide whether first or third person point of view is best for your story’s voice.

He Said, She Said: Dialogue Tags

Kellie Sheridan tells you to be careful how you use dialogue tags in your writing.

How Well Do You Know Voices?

Meghan Jashinsky talks about voice and gives some games to see how well you recognize the WordNerds’ voices as well as voices from popular YA books.

Vulgarity and Violence in YA Literature

In this Sunday Special live chat, the WordNerds talk about whether or not there are boundaries to what your young adult characters should be saying/thinking/doing.

What Did You Say?

E. Latimer talks about whether or not that dialogue tag is actually a dialogue tag, and how to properly use the ones that are.

Writing Strong Voice

Meghan Jashinsky gives examples of strong voice in kidlit.